Sixth Form (A Levels)

Online A Level History

Description

Our CAIE A Level History course online offers a rigorous examination of significant global events and trends from the 19th and 20th centuries, diving deeper into the history of specific regions. Designed to enhance not just historical knowledge and understanding but also the requisite skills for effective historical research, our online History A Level course is a comprehensive package that is perfect for those already fascinated by the past.

In this course, students explore essential historical concepts such as cause and effect, continuity and change, and similarity and difference. They also learn how to critically evaluate and apply historical evidence in their studies. Our A Level History online curriculum serves as a solid foundation for those wishing to undertake further academic study in history and fosters a lifelong interest in the subject.

Homework, Assessment and Reporting

Students enrolled in our A Level History course online are expected to complete at least one homework assignment per subject each week. To ensure maximum success in the sixth form, it’s crucial to revise notes regularly to solidify learning. Following our guiding principle, students should engage in an hour of independent study for every hour of formal teaching they receive.

To provide a transparent and structured evaluation of your academic performance, Level 5 internal assessments are conducted in June, and Level 6 internal mock assessments occur in November and March. Subsequently, reports are issued at the end of the Autumn and Summer terms for Level 5, and after the mock assessments for Level 6 in the Autumn and Spring terms. These reports encompass grades for both attainment and effort in each subject, supplemented by insightful comments from Success Coaches and the Head Teacher.

Parental Engagement

Parents are highly encouraged to use their family Teams account to maintain ongoing dialogue with teachers regarding their child’s progress. This unique setup allows for more detailed tracking throughout the academic year, far surpassing what can be gleaned from a single annual parent consultation evening.

By opting for our A Level History online course, you’re choosing an academic journey that not only prepares you for further education but also instils a nuanced understanding of the world’s historical landscape.

Click here to see this year’s Assessment and Reporting schedule

The CAIE A Level History syllabus (9489) aims to develop:

  • an interest in the past and an appreciation of human endeavour
  • a greater knowledge and understanding of historical periods or themes
  • a greater awareness of historical concepts such as cause and effect, similarity and difference, and change and continuity
  • an appreciation of the nature and diversity of historical sources available and the methods used by historians
  • an exploration of a variety of approaches to different aspects of history and different interpretations of particular historical issues
  • the ability to think independently and make informed judgements on issues
  • an empathy with people living in different places and at different times
  • a firm foundation for further study of History

Papers 1 and 2:

European option: Modern Europe, 1750–1921

  • France, 1774–1814
  • The Industrial Revolution in Britain, 1750–1850
  • Liberalism and nationalism in Germany, 1815–71
  • The Russian Revolution, 1894–1921

American option: The history of the USA, 1820–1941

  • The origins of the Civil War, 1820–61
  • Civil War and Reconstruction, 1861–77
  • The Gilded Age and Progressive Era, 1870s–1920
  • The Great Crash, the Great Depression and the New Deal policies, 1920–41

International option: International history, 1870–1945

  • Empire and the emergence of world powers, 1870–1919
  • The League of Nations and international relations in the 1920s
  • The League of Nations and international relations in the 1930s
  • China and Japan, 1912–45

Paper 3

Topic 1: The origins of the First World War

Candidates will study the following content and the differing interpretations that historians have produced, with particular focus on the over-arching key question, ‘Who was to blame for the First World War?’

This topic covers the following events and developments in the evolution of the First World War c.1890–1914:

  • Tensions between the Great Powers including the Moroccan Crises
  • The alliance system
  • The growth of militarism
  • The arms race
  • Instability in the Balkans
  • War plans
  • The assassination at Sarajevo and the July crisis
  • Mobilisation and declarations of war

Topic 2: The Holocaust

Candidates will study the following content and the differing interpretations that historians have produced, with a particular focus on the over-arching key question, ‘Why did the Holocaust occur?’

This topic covers the following events and developments:

  • The background of European and German anti-Semitism and racist theories
  • Nazi anti-Semitism and persecution of the Jews, 1933–41
  • The impact of war on Nazi policy towards the Jews
  • Ghettoisation and Jewish responses to the Holocaust
  • The development of Nazi extermination policies towards Jews and other minorities
  • Contemporary reactions to the Holocaust

Topic 3: The origins and development of the Cold War

Candidates will study the following content and the differing interpretations that historians have produced, with a particular focus on the over-arching key question, ‘Who was to blame for the Cold War?’

This topic covers the following events and developments in the evolution of the Cold War in Europe, 1941–50:

  • Tensions in the wartime alliance against the Axis powers
  • Peace-making at the end of the Second World War
  • Increasing tensions in a divided Europe
  • The Truman Doctrine and the Marshall Plan
  • The Berlin Blockade and Airlift

Paper 4

European option, Depth study 1: European history in the interwar years, 1919–41

  • Theme 1: Mussolini’s Italy, 1919–41
  • Theme 2: Stalin’s Russia, 1924–41
  • Theme 3: Hitler’s Germany, 1929–41
  • Theme 4: Britain, 1919–39

American option, Depth study 2: The USA, 1944–92

  • Theme 1: The late 1940s and 1950s
  • Theme 2: The 1960s and the 1970s
  • Theme 3: The 1980s and early 1990s
  • Theme 4: Foreign policy 1944–92

International option, Depth study 3: International history, 1945–92

  • Theme 1: US–Soviet relations during the Cold War, 1950–91
  • Theme 2: The spread of communism in East and Southeast Asia, 1945–91
  • Theme 3: Decolonisation, the Cold War and the UN in Sub-Saharan Africa, 1950–92
  • Theme 4: Conflict in the Middle East, 1948–91

Paper 1: Document question

Written paper, 1 hour 15 minutes, 40 marks
Candidates will complete one document question on one of these options:

  • European option: Modern Europe, 1750–1921
  • American option: The history of the USA, 1820–1941
  • International option: International history, 1870–1945

The topics within these options will rotate year-on-year.
There will be two parts to each question.
Part (a) Candidates will be expected to consider two sources on one aspect of the material.
Part (b) Candidates will be expected to use all the sources and their knowledge of the period to address how far the sources support a given statement.
Candidates must answer both parts of the question they choose.
Sources will contain a maximum of 600 words and there will be at least three sources on a specific issue.
Evidence will contain material from a range of documentary sources.

Paper 2: Outline study

Written paper, 1 hour 45 minutes, 60 marks
Candidates will select two questions from one of these options:

  • European option: Modern Europe, 1750–1921
  • American option: The history of the USA, 1820–1941
  • International option: International history, 1870–1945

The topics within these options will rotate year-on-year.
There will be two parts to each question.
Part (a) requires a causal explanation: consideration of the significance of factors and connections between causes.
Part (b) requires consideration of significance and weighing the relative importance of factors.
Candidates must answer both parts of the question they choose.

A Level history exam information

A Level history exam information

Paper 3: Interpretations question

Written paper, 1 hour 15 minutes, 40 marks
Candidates will select one question from one of these options:

  • Topic 1: The origins of the First World War
  • Topic 2: The Holocaust
  • Topic 3: The origins and development of the Cold War

One extract of no more than 600 words in length from an historian’s writing will be set on each of the topics.
The author of the extract will not be identified, nor will candidates be asked to identify the author.
There will be a single question, asking candidates what they can learn from the extract about the interpretation and approach of the historian who wrote it.
They will be expected to show knowledge and understanding of the events and developments included in the topic (Assessment Objective 1), but the purpose of the study will be for them to develop the ability to analyse and evaluate how aspects of the past have been interpreted and represented (Assessment Objective 4).

Paper 4: Depth study

Written paper, 1 hour 45 minutes, 60 marks
Candidates will select two questions on their chosen depth study:

  • European option, Depth study 1: European history in the interwar years, 1919–41
  • American option, Depth study 2: The USA, 1944–92
  • International option, Depth study 3: International history, 1945–92

It is the parents’ responsibility to arrange their child’s examinations; our teachers will provide all the support required. Most students will sit their examination papers at a school or college who accept private candidates. Some students sit their examinations at private examination centres.

If you are intending to study A Level History after IGCSE, we recommend that you spend some time in the summer holidays preparing. Here are some suggested activities:

Watch:

Film – October (Ten days that shook the world) 

Film – Les Miserables – Available on all the major streaming services

Youtube – Jeremy Paxman, BBC Empire Episode 2 – Making Ourselves at Home Documentary

Film – Napoleon (2023) – watch it when it’s released in November…

Youtube short – The Bolshevik Party: the Russian Communists and the Difference between Bolsheviks and Mensheviks 

Youtube short – Ten Minute History – German Unification and Empire 

Listen:

Podcasts on a Range of Topics – Historical Association – History Resources for Students

Podcast – Historical Association – Weltpolitik and German Nationalism

Podcast – Lockhart, R.B., ‘The February Revolution of 1917’, History Today, 41:2 (February, 1991)  

Podcast – BBC History Hour – The Russian Revolution: The Bolsheviks Take Control 

Read:

Journal article – Anderson, P., ‘Why did the Bolsheviks win the Russian Civil War?’, History Review 43, September 2002. 

What is covered in the A Level History online course?

The online A Level History course, following the CAIE syllabus (9489), delves into major global issues from the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. It not only enriches students’ historical knowledge but also focuses on research skills, exploring concepts like cause and effect, continuity, and change.

How does the History A Level course prepare students for further study?

The course equips students with the critical skills needed for historical research and analysis. It lays a solid foundation for further academic exploration in History and nurtures a lifelong interest in the subject.

What is the homework and assessment structure for the online History A Level?

Students are encouraged to complete at least one homework assignment per subject each week. Additionally, for each hour spent in class, an equivalent hour of independent study is recommended. Internal assessments and mock exams take place at specific times during the year, with detailed reports issued afterwards.

How can parents monitor their child’s progress in the History A Level online course?

Parents have the option to use a family Teams account to engage with teachers. This platform offers the advantage of detailed tracking of the student’s progress, going beyond what is typically offered in an annual parent consultation evening.

What skills and understanding will the History A Level course develop?

The course aims to cultivate an interest in historical periods and themes, foster awareness of historical concepts, and sharpen skills in evaluating sources and methodologies. It encourages independent thought, informed judgement, and empathy towards people from various backgrounds and time periods.

How to apply

Our school places fill quickly, apply today to avoid dissapointment!

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